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Can one cure raw bacon on a webber smoker?

 
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Changeling
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01 12 6:07 am    Post subject: Can one cure raw bacon on a webber smoker? Reply with quote

I was wondering if one could make/cure great bacon like "Farm Land" on a Webber 18/20" smoker? This would cinch it for me on getting the larger model! However sadly, I know nothing about whether it can be done or not.

Changeling
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ComradeQ
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01 12 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can "cure" bacon easily at home. There are lots of recipes on this forum, you need a basic cure ratio (see Harry's posts) which include some sort of curing salt with sodium nitrite and a blend of salt, sugar and other flavourings. Now as far as curing on a smoker you don't, the curing is done in a fridge and takes about 5-10 days, depending in the thickness of the belly. The smoking can be done either hot or cold. Hot results in an eastern European style bacon that is fully cooked and does not require additional cooking, although you definately can fry it like regular bacon. Cold smoking results in a product more like what we in north America are used to, smokey but raw bacon that has to be cooked, and is done at under 100 degrees temp. Hope this helps, any other questions and ill be happy to help you with them. Wink

Hot or cold smoked your bacon will be better than any store bought product. It is important to follow cures exactly and sodium nitrite (pink salt, curing salt) is mandatory if you want the meat to be pink, have the bacon taste and consistency, and, especially when cold smoking, to ensure bacteria does not grow on your meat and make you sick or kill you. Good luck!
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Oregon smoker
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01 12 9:40 am    Post subject: Re: Can one cure raw bacon on a webber smoker? Reply with quote

Changeling wrote:
I was wondering if one could make/cure great bacon like "Farm Land" on a Webber 18/20" smoker? This would cinch it for me on getting the larger model! However sadly, I know nothing about whether it can be done or not.

Changeling



You dont cure stuff on a smoker. It happens in a fridge with certain temperatures, and some other stuff.
If you want a one stop cure, try Morton's Tender Quick to start with.
There are a ton of recipes here using either a dry curing process or a brine process. I prefer a dry cure. And i cook my canadian bacon to 155° so it is edible without additional cooking.
Slab bacon i have not done yet, i cannot find bellies at a reasonable price.



That is using a basic dry cure. Along with some other stuff. But it involved TQ. I have the #1 and #2 in the cupboard but have yet to use it(still trying to find bellies at a decent price).
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Changeling
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04 12 4:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oregon smoker and ComradeQ, thanks a lot for the reply.

I used a bad choice of word in describing the question!

When I was being raised my Dad smoked Hams, Bacon, and we made a "Ton" of sausage that my Mom would basically "Can"! If you have never had caned sausage, it was great/awesome!

The hams and bacons (salt cured first) were what one would call cold smoke. It was done in smoke house under a small fire/smoke/smoulder for x amount of days then hung in the basement where we sliced off what we needed.
The hams/shoulders/bacon slabs were artery pumped and/or salt cured before the cold smoking took place.

Unfortunately I was a "Know it all kid" and didn't care for doing/learning the process from my Dad, very sorry to say!!

Now I'm back to ground "0" , an idiot! I don't have the room for a smoke house !
Trying to reconstruct my memories as best I can. This means I don't have the room or knowledge to do what we did so very long ago! Hope you guys understand.

Changeling
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Oregon smoker
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04 12 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Changeling wrote:
Oregon smoker and ComradeQ, thanks a lot for the reply.

I used a bad choice of word in describing the question!

When I was being raised my Dad smoked Hams, Bacon, and we made a "Ton" of sausage that my Mom would basically "Can"! If you have never had caned sausage, it was great/awesome!

The hams and bacons (salt cured first) were what one would call cold smoke. It was done in smoke house under a small fire/smoke/smoulder for x amount of days then hung in the basement where we sliced off what we needed.
The hams/shoulders/bacon slabs were artery pumped and/or salt cured before the cold smoking took place.

Unfortunately I was a "Know it all kid" and didn't care for doing/learning the process from my Dad, very sorry to say!!

Now I'm back to ground "0" , an idiot! I don't have the room for a smoke house !
Trying to reconstruct my memories as best I can. This means I don't have the room or knowledge to do what we did so very long ago! Hope you guys understand.

Changeling



In short yes, you can cold smoke on a kettle grill. Just keep the temps down and the meat as far away as possible.
As to the hanging of meat, i have no idea. I have always wanted to do but have no critter free areas to do.
Good luck!
IMO if you do some reading here about curing canadian bacon(uses pork loins) that will give you a place to start w/out to much frustration.
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ComradeQ
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04 12 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Changeling wrote:
Oregon smoker and ComradeQ, thanks a lot for the reply.

I used a bad choice of word in describing the question!

When I was being raised my Dad smoked Hams, Bacon, and we made a "Ton" of sausage that my Mom would basically "Can"! If you have never had caned sausage, it was great/awesome!

The hams and bacons (salt cured first) were what one would call cold smoke. It was done in smoke house under a small fire/smoke/smoulder for x amount of days then hung in the basement where we sliced off what we needed.
The hams/shoulders/bacon slabs were artery pumped and/or salt cured before the cold smoking took place.

Unfortunately I was a "Know it all kid" and didn't care for doing/learning the process from my Dad, very sorry to say!!

Now I'm back to ground "0" , an idiot! I don't have the room for a smoke house !
Trying to reconstruct my memories as best I can. This means I don't have the room or knowledge to do what we did so very long ago! Hope you guys understand.

Changeling


Check my post here http://thesmokering.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=59235, I cold smoke my bacon using a method that Jarhead suggested. You can do this on a BBQ or on a smoker, even in a box if you're careful ... get a large #10 metal can, poke 2-3 holes in the bottom of the can and around the outside base about an inch up and spaced about an inch apart. Heat 2-3 charcoal coals to glowing, put in bottom of can, toss wood chips on top, and use something as a damper like a cast iron pan. Just keep adding wood chips as the smoke burns out. It does not generate much heat at all and you can smoke things easily without cooking them. For curing ratios, I use Harry Nutziak (posts in this topic). The important thing is to use the right curing salts and ratios and to make sure you allow them to cure the correct amount of time. Does this help?
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ComradeQ
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04 12 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In case you were wondering, this.is the cure ratio (per 5lbs of pork belly)

1 tsp Curing Salt (pink salt sodium nitrate cure) 
3.75 tbsp Salt 
3.75 tbsp Sugar 
2 tbsp Roughly cracked black pepper 

Rub this well into the meat then add to a large freezer bag, combined with a cup of honey or maple or brown sugar, etc. You can add favours at this point too if you want to use garlic powder or juniper berries, whatever you like. Im working on a vanilla bourbon cure right now. Once a day for the duration on the curing time you should rub the bag to make sure the meat is evenly coated, and then turn it over. Repeat every day for 5-10 days (I find for 5lb pork belly 7 days has worked perfectly). The meat will be firmed up when cured, and darken a bit in colour.

Remove the belly a day before smoking and rinse really well under running water for about 5 mins, making sure to dry really well when done. Don't worry about some pepper being stuck on, that's flavour! Then place it back in the fridge on a cooling rack uncovered overnight until ready to smoke. This forms a pellicle, a tacky surface on the meat that allows smoke to stick and penetrate the meat better. Using whatever method you want to smoke (my method above works well for cold smoking but you can also do a warm or hot smoke on a smoker for a different kind of bacon). I cold smoke for about 8 hours using different woods for different flavour. I find hickory a bit strong so apple with a little hickory is good, or maple wood for maple bacon, nice and mellow. You can oversmoke so don't go crazy with too much smoke or for too long. When done remove, place back in a large freezer bag, put in the fridge for a day or two for the smoke to mellow (but not before slicing a sample if you like, lol) There's my step by step process and remember ... post pics here so we can admire your cured meat skills! Good luck!!
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Changeling
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11 12 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ComradeQ, thanks a bunch. Now I "Know" I can do it!

This is the end that I am working towards, and I really think I can do it.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20 12 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ComradeQ would that cure work for Canadian Bacon also?
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Changeling
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10 13 5:57 am    Post subject: Low smoking on a 18.5" Webber bullet type smoker? Reply with quote

I know I asked this before and received "excellent" advice on curing bacon.

However I really do need to know if the "18.5" Webber bullet smoker" can reach the low temperatures necessary to smoke the bacon (wiothout smothering out) after the cure period and how many pounds/slabs can be safely smoked at one time if any one knows?
An approximation would be great as I rfealize it it is not a very large smoker unit.

This wouldn't be a problem if I didn't have COPD! So, unfortunately I have to ask the above questions.
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SoEzzy
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10 13 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get yourself a small can, a pumpkin pie mix can is about the right size, drill the sides and bottom full of holes.

Start 4 or 5 briquettes drop them in the can, then add half a chunk of wood to the top of the lit briquettes, open the door and pop it in, then shut the door.

In 25 - 30 minutes start 4 or 5 more briquettes, open the door and put them on top of what's left of the wood.

4 briquettes will give you between 110° and 125°, 5 will push you up to about 145° - 150°.

At about the hour mark add another half chuck of wood, then start some more briquettes, add them when they are fully lit.

All you need to do to keep the temperature down is a very small fire.
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Changeling
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11 13 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks SoEZZY, that was pretty clear.

How many slabs of bacon do you think the 18.5" vertical Webber smoker can handle correctly on average for the low smoke process?
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