FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 


welding advice?
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Smoke Ring Forum Index -> Welding
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
DawgPhan
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 3444

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 4:00 am    Post subject: welding advice? Reply with quote

I saw a MIG welder in the paper for $200 bucks or so that said it was good for welding up to 1/8th inch steel...now my question would be how much training would it take for me to be able to use that thing? I mean if i bought it and got me some gloves and goggles would i be able to weld 2 pieces of metal together to practice so that maybe one day I could build my own pit? What does MIG stand for...well I guess that is more of a google question, but figured I might as well ask...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mds2
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 10 Mar 2005
Posts: 1366
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 4:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It really isnt hard to learn how to weld. But it is a lot easier if you have somebody teach you in person.
_________________


The Saucy Lads BBQ Team
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bedlam BBQ
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 31 Aug 2006
Posts: 1609
Location: Broken Arrow, OK

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 4:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, here is something I can help you out with (a little). I've been looking into getting a MIG welder set up as well.

But to answer one of your questions:
MIG Welding (GMAW or Gas Metal Arc Welding) - Also referred to as solid wire welding. An arc welding process which joins metals by heating them with an arc. The arc is between a continuously fed filler metal (consumable) electrode and the workpiece. Externally supplied gas or gas mixtures provide shielding.


But as far as whether that $200 welder will be any good, my advice is to find out the make and model and check out the specs on that company's web site. There is something called "duty rating" that can make your life pleasant or make you wish you'd never gotten out of bed. I'm no welder, but I'll pass along what I've read about. Some of these "duty ratings" can be so low that you have to wait 8-10 minutes after every 30-45 seconds of use -- that's a lot of time to just sit around and enjoy a cold beverage. But I wouldn't suggest enjoying too many of those and then getting back to the welder.

Best of luck with whatever you decide. I'm going to purchase one at some point, but luckly right now my brother has one and is going to be doing my welding on my new pit.
_________________
Steve

Stumper clone with Stoker
Bedlam BBQ
Competition Team
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DawgPhan
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 3444

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 4:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks about the duty rating...I will check that out...I mean the guys on tv make it look so easy....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bedlam BBQ
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 31 Aug 2006
Posts: 1609
Location: Broken Arrow, OK

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 4:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know what you mean about making it look easy. They keep showing commercials for a local welding school and you just see those guys taking that MIG welder and running down a maze with it.

Here's more information that may help you understand more about the techniques for MIG welding (I've watched them all). http://www.millerwelds.com/education/basicMIG/index.htm
I'm hoping my brother will actually be teaching me to weld while he is welding up my new pit. But even having a welder, that's only half the battle. You also need some sort of cutter as well -- although I keep hearing that you can use the MIG welder as a cutter also. I'll have to look into that more.
_________________
Steve

Stumper clone with Stoker
Bedlam BBQ
Competition Team
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gourmet-Gator
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 24 Apr 2006
Posts: 1806
Location: Evans, Georgia

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 5:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Dawg, it's easy...If you would just IM me back maybe we could be friends and I would more than happily help you! Very Happy Life's too short to be a hater!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Underdog
Newbie


Joined: 19 Dec 2006
Posts: 57

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Been doing autobody all my adult life so I'm familiar with welders. Can tell you that Mig is much easier than stick welding. I have a Lincoln SP200. Old discontinued model but built really rugged. Don't know of any MIG that cuts. Cutters are called plasma cutters and ones that cut heavy gauge steel get pricey. Oxy Acetelene torch is much cheaper but puts a lot more heat into the metal and harder to cut straight lines. One thing I can tell you about welding is that you will be able to pick it up faster and do nicer work with the correct helmet. I really reccomend the autodarkening ones out now. They've gotten really inexpensive and most offer an adjustable darkness. It really helps if you can see the weld puddle well. Wish I could smoke meat as well as I weld. I'm workin on it! LOL
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SMOKESTACKS BBQ
BBQ Fan


Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 293
Location: ozarks

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

no doubt that your be able to get the hang of a mig welder ive used one alot here lately building my smokers.pay attention to the duty cycle.the bigest thing to get used to is how hot you want and what wire speed you want they go hand in hand together.if not itll splatter on you and you wont get a good bead.cb12
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mrcustomsteel
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 01 Mar 2005
Posts: 1997
Location: Bilings, still a Texan, MT

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you can find someone who can spend about a half hour just to get you started on the MIG, you could take it from there. What takes practice is all the adjustments of the settings and odd position welding. You can't always lay a smoker over so you can weld flat on it.

If that welder is a 220V input, you might be OK with it. What brand and model is it? But if it is only 1/8" capacity it is probably not 220V.

Ask around town. I'm sure someone would trade a few hours welding instruction for a cooked brisket. I sure would.
_________________
D. Tillery
Texan transplanted in Billings, MT
www.mrcustomsteel.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
skybob
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Wichita, KS

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A MIG welder for $200 won't have the gas regulator with it, it'll be an option for more bucks. The SP200 is a fantastic welder, I had 2 of them and tried wearing them out. Put a gazillion miles of wire through them and they were still going strong last time I saw them.
Dawg, what you might do is check out a local VoTech or Adult Ed place. Lots of times they have practical welding classes that you can take in the evening, get college credit for and actually learn to weld various things. The overhead is the pits, you keep trying to burn yourself up. The vertical isn't too bad, the horizontal weld is cake. When you do a pit, you're going to get a dose of each type.
I got a cheapee autodarkening helmet at Harbor Freight for about$40 on sale. Works great for what I do anymore.
Good luck on your project.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wnkt
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 1329
Location: Upstate South Carolina

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm taking a stick welding class in the evenings now for the express purpose of building my own smoker one of these days. The thing I didnt like about the idea of MIG welding is that it requires shielding gas, in most cases. I have seen references where it isn't needed, Im not sure what those cases are though.
I have to agree with the Auto darkening shield/helmet, I currently have a regular one and it is VERY difficult, just starting out, to flip down the shield and then get the arc started. I saw Northern Tool and Equipment has one on sale for $49.99 where you can also adjust the shade.
_________________
Electricity can be dangerous. My nephew tried to stick a penny into a plug. Whoever said a penny doesn't go far didn't see him shoot across that floor. I told him he was grounded. - Tim Allen
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
skybob
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Wichita, KS

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The $200 welder will be using a little larger wire and it doesn't need gas, go a flux core or something like that. It's the pits to try very light welding without the gas shielding because you can use lots smaller wire and lower heat with the gas shield.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Big Tom
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 20 Jun 2006
Posts: 1234
Location: Owensboro, KY

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MIG welding is an acronym for Metal Inert Gas welding; welding with the use of shielding gas. The process is GMAW (gas metal arc welding), another type of wire welding is Flux core welding. Both processes use a continuous wire to both conduct the electricity for the arc and as the filler metal. The GMAW-MIG (solid wire) welding uses an inert gas to shield the weld from oxygen in the atmosphere. The flux core wire welding uses a tubular wire that contains a flux powder in the core of the wire (ie: flux core), as the arc is started and the wire is fed into the weld the flux is burned to shield the weld forming a slag cover of the weld bead. Very much like "stick" welding. Flux core is well suited for outdoors welding since you don't have to worry about the gas being blown away with the wind, the only negative would be the required slag chipping and spatter compared to a well set mig weld.

Many of the less expensive wire welders sold for home use are for the flux core process. The flux core machines don't require regulators or solenoids to control the shielding gas flow, reducing the cost. A big difference with the home units compared to the industrial rigs is the output capacity and duty cycle.

The wire welding can be the easiest type of welding to learn. Practice and correct machine settings are critical to good welds. A little bit of instruction on the set-up of a specific welder with a pile of metal to practice with and anyone can learn to weld.

Vocational centers are great places to learn to weld and possibly work on projects (building cookers).

A $200 welder might be a good deal, alot of factors to consider to truly evalutate the value.

Just a few long winded thoughts....
_________________
Big Tom
Pigs-R-Us Cooking Team
Owensboro, KY / Corinth, MS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Oregon smoker
BBQ All Star


Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 6246
Location: Portland, OR

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

very good advice here on all counts. the next best thing is to find a good friend that is willing to go shopping with you that is a welder by trade.
my needs are not only for welding a Q together but i also ride motorcycles and plan on eventually either doing a "bobber" project or making my own frame.
another thing to think about is how are you gonna bend or form the metal. i made my charcoal basket with a brake out of the stuff just settin around the garage.
jason
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
romex2121
BBQ Pro


Joined: 06 Sep 2006
Posts: 515
Location: CARLSBAD N.M.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

like these guys said a good auto darkining helment will sure make it
a lot eaiser on you,,,,,i prefer stick over mig but thats just me Rolling Eyes
its really not that hard to learn a little paitance and a lot of practice
and you will be producing nice welds in no time Wink ......,,,,
one word of advice DO NOT buy a 110 welder they just dont have the power for what your wanting to do as far as a good heavy smoker
_________________
a dime is a dollar with the taxes taken out
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
elk
BBQ Fan


Joined: 19 Jun 2006
Posts: 328
Location: St. Louis

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A small mig welder can weld alot of stuff. MIG- If I remember correctly is metal inert gas. Mig welders can use different wire. Flux-core requires chipping slag. A wire that requires a shielding gas, while a bit more expensive to begin with, produces an easier weld to work with from an emerging welder's standpoint. Pretty welds don't need to be ground down if you have the proper penetration. With that being said, I often tell the folks where I work that I can give them a pretty weld, or a weld that holds; sometimes both at the same time. I personally love to weld! I'm in a management position in the company I work for; I love nothing more than to put in the ear plugs and get under the hood and have my secretary hold my calls cause I'm busy!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jeff T
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 08 Mar 2005
Posts: 4207
Location: Norfolk, Nebraska

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Underdog wrote:
Been doing autobody all my adult life so I'm familiar with welders. Can tell you that Mig is much easier than stick welding. I have a Lincoln SP200. Old discontinued model but built really rugged. Don't know of any MIG that cuts. Cutters are called plasma cutters and ones that cut heavy gauge steel get pricey. Oxy Acetelene torch is much cheaper but puts a lot more heat into the metal and harder to cut straight lines. One thing I can tell you about welding is that you will be able to pick it up faster and do nicer work with the correct helmet. I really reccomend the autodarkening ones out now. They've gotten really inexpensive and most offer an adjustable darkness. It really helps if you can see the weld puddle well. Wish I could smoke meat as well as I weld. I'm workin on it! LOL


Hey Underdog bodyman huh? me too been doing bodywork for 20 years now. Insurance companys keeping you busy or low and slow most times?
Sure not like it was 5 years ago, kinda slow without snow.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
3970010
BBQ Super Fan


Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 408
Location: Houston, Texas

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SStory wrote:
There is something called "duty rating" that can make your life pleasant or make you wish you'd never gotten out of bed. I'm no welder, but I'll pass along what I've read about. Some of these "duty ratings" can be so low that you have to wait 8-10 minutes after every 30-45 seconds of use -- .



Thats a good piece of information. I have been looking into getting a mig welder. Not that I want to build a pit, (I would go to Gator Pits or Pitts & Spitts for that, in fact I have), its just that sometimes I have an idea for one of my BBQ rig trailers that I might like to try sometimes. I have also been wanting to build one of those Stumps Clones too I guess. This whole thread is pretty usefull.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Bedlam BBQ
BBQ Super Pro


Joined: 31 Aug 2006
Posts: 1609
Location: Broken Arrow, OK

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

3970010 wrote:
I have also been wanting to build one of those Stumps Clones too I guess. This whole thread is pretty usefull.


This is exactly why I have been looking into getting a welder. I'm gathering steel right now to begin building my Stumper clone. Should be able to start cutting and welding the frame this weekend. I'll be watching and learning from my brother while he welds my smoker together.

But there are so many projects around the house that would be great if I had a decent welder and knew how to use it. I don't think I'd want to get into welding for a living, but being able to do little tasks on the side would help pay for the welder.
_________________
Steve

Stumper clone with Stoker
Bedlam BBQ
Competition Team
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
romex2121
BBQ Pro


Joined: 06 Sep 2006
Posts: 515
Location: CARLSBAD N.M.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24 07 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

them littlle side jobs will surely happen when the nighbors find out
you can weld, my nighbors keep me pretty busy, everything from
'clothes lines to frames for chop saws.
i dont do anything to big because i dont consider my self a welder
and i dont want to get into something over my head
but the nighbors seem happy
_________________
a dime is a dollar with the taxes taken out
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Smoke Ring Forum Index -> Welding All times are GMT + 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group