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Made Some Chicken Stock, First Time. Got a Question.

 
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jeepdad
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 6:05 am    Post subject: Made Some Chicken Stock, First Time. Got a Question. Reply with quote

So, I been wanting to make my own stock for a long time just have not taken the time to make some. That all changed this past weekend. With gumbo weather fast approaching I wanted to make stock ahead of time and have on hand. So I did. I have always used water while making gumbo wanted to try using homemade stock.


Forty-three and a half pounds of deboned thighs and drumsticks. Man, the stock better make my gumbo stand up and sing because it took a while to debone.


Cold water added.


I think I'm going to have to take some out because when I add the bones it will overflow. Ha!


Bones done in the oven for an hour to brown up...per the recipe. Had three trays of bones.


Bones added.


About hour three and a half to four.


Veggies and spices added. Man the house smelled great!






Smoked a couple chickens while making the stock. The girls had 3-4 friends over to help us eat.








Smashed taters.


Strained the stock twice and this is what I got. Canning pot full of stock. I let it sit for three hours then placed in the fridge for two days.


After taking out of the fridge I spooned the fat cap off. Time to bag the stock for the freezer.


Four gallons so far. I will take out of the box and stack once it freezes. Put in the box in case of a leak.


One more gallon so five altogether. Can you say big pot of gumbo!!!

Questions for you stock makers.

1. The recipe says if I did it right it should be clear. Mine is not clear and I think I followed the recipe only a much larger scale. Any thoughts?

2. Anyone use stock for their gumbo?

Thanks for looking.

--jeepdad


CHICKEN STOCK
(from the Gumbo Pages website)

Don't be intimidated by this. It's easy. You have four parts to making a stock -- the COLD water, the bones/meat, the aromatic vegetables (or mirepoix to use the snooty French culinary term) and the seasonings packet (or sachet d'epices, in French).

For a white chicken stock, place the bones/meat directly into the cold water for the stock; for a brown stock, brown the bones in a 350°F oven until dark golden brown, almost an hour. This makes an incredibly rich, flavorful stock with tons of body. If you don't have five hours to make stock, you can do the quick chicken stock in about an hour.

This recipe works well for turkey or duck stocks also.

6 quarts cold water
8 pounds chicken parts (backs, necks, etc.) and bones, or a whole chicken, cut up

Mirepoix
8 ounces onions, chopped
4 ounces celery with tops, chopped
4 ounces carrots, chopped
2 small heads garlic, cut in half horizontally

Sachet d'epices
1 teaspoon or so black peppercorns, cracked
6-8 parsley stems, chopped
1 bay leaf
1/4 tsp. dried thyme leaves
1/4 tsp. dried tarragon leaves
1/4 tsp. dried oregano leaves
1/4 tsp. dried basil leaves

The above ingredients are placed into a 4" square of cheesecloth and tied into a sack, or use a metal tea ball.

Remove the skin from the chicken and chop into 3-4 inch pieces, making sure to cut through and expose the bones. Put the chicken in the stockpot with the water and bring slowly to a simmer. Periodically skim off any scum that forms, and if you wish use a skimmer to skim off the fat. (This stock simmering process makes your house smell REALLY good!) Let this simmer for at least three, and preferably four hours. (It is this long simmering process that extracts the maximum flavor from the chicken meat and bones, as well as the natural gelatin from the bones. When refrigerated, a good chicken stock will be clear and gelatinous.)

Add the mirepoix and sachet; tie the sachet closed with some twine and tie the long end of the twine to the handle of the pot; this makes the bag easier to retrieve. (A tea ball also works well.) Simmer for at least one more hour.

Remember that during the simmering process, it's best not to stir the stock. The end result will be much clearer if it is not agitated while simmering.

Strain thoroughly; the best way to do this is to ladle the stock out and pour it through a strainer which has been lined with a couple of layers of damp cheesecloth. If you're using the stock immediately, skim off as much fat as you can with a fat skimmer or a piece of paper towel, otherwise cool the stock right away by placing the container into an ice-water-filled sink, stirring to bring the hot liquid from the center to the sides of the container. Don't just put hot stock in the refrigerator; it won't cool enough to prevent possible multiplication of harmful bacteria. To defat the stock easily, refrigerate overnight, until the fat solidifies on the surface, then skim off.

You'll know you've made a really great stock with lots of body when you refrigerate it overnight, and the next morning when you go to skim off the fat the stock looks like chicken Jell-O. (See it jiggle!)

Makes about 4 quarts of stock.
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BigOrson
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clearing a chicken stock is a pain in the butt and unless your finished product requires it to be clear for show, not worth the effort. I married a Cajun when I lived in New Orleans for a decade, and I have always used stock in my gumbo. In fact, I trim the backbones off of my leg quarters and freeze them in zipper bags until I get 20 lbs of them or so. then I'll boil them on the stove, simmer them for about 12 hours at low heat, cool, and then pick the meat off the bones. Refrigerate to congeal fat to be removed). Ready to use. Very versatile stuff. If you want smaller portions for smaller dishes, freeze some in old-time icecube trays and then store the cubes in zipper bags in the freezer. Need just a little? Pop out a few cubes and add to a sauce.
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jeepdad
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks BO. It was a lot of work but hopefully it will pay off. All the best.

--Dan
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k.a.m.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks good Brother. I believe I will stick to cooking down my smoked birds the day of the gumbo for my stock. That way one huge mess for Debbie to clean up instead of two.
Oh I am looking around to see if she is reading this. Laughing
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jeepdad
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haaaaaaaaaaaaa! I hope you are still alive this morning! Very Happy Very Happy Thanks my coonass brother.

--Dan
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k.a.m.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jeepdad wrote:
Haaaaaaaaaaaaa! I hope you are still alive this morning! Very Happy Very Happy Thanks my coonass brother.

--Dan


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ckone
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09 14 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always use stock for my gumbo.


I grill chicken pretty often and always buy whole birds, then cut them up myself. The back, and neck always go in the freezer until I am in the mood to make stock. (starting some today)

Not sure what your recipe was, but here is my method for a clear stock:

cover bones in water and bring to boil for about 5 minutes or until foamy on top. Pour out cooking water and rinse off bones with cool water. Clean the pot. Put bones back in the pot with carrot, celery, onion, bay leaves and some pepper corns, cover with water and bring to a boil. Once at a boil turn down to a lazy bubble (just one bubble every few seconds) skim as needed, cook overnight. (I tend to cook it for a day and a half, just add more water as needed)

Strain and store


Oh and don't chop the veggies. I just cut the onion in half, the celery and carrot go in whole. Also chicken feet make a great addition. Lots of natural gelatin.
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jeepdad
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10 14 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haaaaaaa! Whew, my coonass brother thought you might have been a goner. Shocked Very Happy Tell the Queen thanks for sparing ya.


ckone I like your way seems straight forward and easy. Will cut and paste. Thanks my friend. Hope all is well.

--Dan
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BUGSnBBQ
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11 14 1:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great looking Pot-o-Gold (I call stock liquid gold Laughing ) ya got going on there jeepdad! It's getting time for me to make some more because I ran out last week. I make big batches, usually 4-5 gallons at a time, and freeze it in quart bags like you did. Couple of notes about my method - I use whole chickens and I don't roast the bones (For Chicken stock. Beef and Turkey I do roast). The veggies are a very rough cut - Onions (skin on), carrots, and celery (with tops) are cut into 4 pieces. I also put Turnips in mine. Started doing that a few years ago and it gives the stock a little somethin-somethin. The only herbs I use are Bay leaf and Thyme. I simmer the chickens until the meat is done, remove meat, then return bones to pot for the rest of the simmer time (7-8 hours).

Homemade Chicken stock is an absolute necessity in my kitchen. It's soooo easy to make and the stuff they sell in stores is so loaded with sodium it boggles my mind.
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phil c
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11 14 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dang it! now I'm hungry!

Gotta make up some gumbo soon, If I could only find some good Boudin around here instead of having my cousin ship it to me.
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ckone
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11 14 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

phil c wrote:
Dang it! now I'm hungry!

Gotta make up some gumbo soon, If I could only find some good Boudin around here instead of having my cousin ship it to me.


Hijack:

What does boudin have to do with gumbo? Are you per chance meaning Andouille?

For good boudin, just make it. It does not have to be cased and can be done with a food processor.

You need Pork liver (chicken will work), pork shoulder, onions,celery, thyme, cayenne, green onions, cooked rice, and salt.

simmer pork, liver, onions, celery and thyme in water until cooked. Strain it and keep the liquid. Grind it all up (or food processor) with the green onions. Mix with the rice and some of the cooking liquid to desired consistency. Season with salt and cayenne to taste.

Case it if you want but I just smear it on crackers. Or roll into balls with some cracker crumb and egg and deep fry.

Hijack over.
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BUGSnBBQ
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 12 14 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ckone wrote:
Hijack over.

Not quite yet Laughing Mmmmm....Boudin balls ROCK! I've been wanting make some Boudin (cased) when I do my annual sausage-making, but I always seem to be worn out from making the other ones and say 'I'll do it next year' Embarassed . It never occurred to me to just make it bulk style (like breakfast sausage) for balls. I'm putting that on my To-Do list right now!
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Chefmikey
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 15 14 11:52 pm    Post subject: Cloudy stock Reply with quote

Hi Jeepdad, nice looking cook there!
A couple of tips - with any poultry, there's no need to roast or cook the bones prior to making stock - cooking them will alter the proteins in the final stock leading to cloudiness.
Also - and this is the key - do NOT let the stock boil, at any time! Boiling will guarantee a cloudy chicken/turkey/duck stock. A simmer is what you need, just let it hum along for 3-4 hours and then strain. I always throw in the veg right off the bat, then bones, then water. Herbs are nice if you want the 'same' flavour in whatever you use the stock for, a 'traditional' chicken stock is left plain (no herbs or spices) so that the final dish (gumbo, gravy, whatever) can be flavoured up to suit that dish.
Chicken stock is DONE in 4 hours, cooking longer will also add to the chances of a cloudy stock.
Beef/pork/veal stocks can go 12-14 hours with roasted bones, but poultry is much more delicate.
I hope that helps - but at the end of the day, cloudy stock is not noticeable in a soup or gumbo and doesn't affect the taste.
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jeepdad
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 16 14 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the feedback and tips folks it is appreciated. Thanks too Chefmikey very informative.

--Dan
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