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Job opening in Norway!

 
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NorwegianWood
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Joined: 24 Feb 2011
Posts: 53
Location: Norway

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02 16 5:15 pm    Post subject: Job opening in Norway! Reply with quote

I'm opening a Grill & BBQ fast casual in a town 1 hours drive from Norway's captiol Oslo. Opening date is the 28th of July.

The menu consist of "everything from Kentucky to Chihuahua". We've got a charcoal grill and a Southern Pride SPX-300 (the first ever SP in Norway).

We've got a small, but experienced team. The only thing we lack is someone that has done BBQ professionally...

So I'm looking for someone with BBQ-restaurant experience, preferably with hands on experience with the SPX-300, to come over and work with us for a while.

I'm open for all kinds of formats actually. Everything from a one-month guest worker concept to a half- or full year engagement. The right person might even jump straight into a manager role - if he/she is interested.

We'll provide a place to stay, access to a car, plane tickets, help with work permits/taxes etc and in general good working conditions.

You'll be working on the line, but with a main focus on lifting our BBQ-knowhow and further develop those menu items.

Think of it as an adventure!

PS! Norway is a high cost country, but that is also reflected in your salery. So for a person looking to save up a few bucks - this could be a smart deal.

Get in touch via PM - or send an email to jonas@generalhotell.no. Some kind of a CV and a few references would be a good start.

Please share with people you think might be interested! Hope to hear from you!

Best regards
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NorwegianWood
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Joined: 24 Feb 2011
Posts: 53
Location: Norway

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BTW: the pay is around $24/hour before tax (guesstimated at around 35%).

And if anyone has good ideas on where else to post this "ad" (Facebook groups etc) - I'm all ears!
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Mr Tony's BBQ
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Joined: 01 Aug 2010
Posts: 5067
Location: Fredonia Wi

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thats a net of $1.00 more than Washington State or parts of California, where they also get welfare on top of said $15 / minimum wage....and tax refunds to boot Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad [ yes, businesses are closing doors, cutting hours, replacing people with machines etc ]
That being said, with you covering living expenses not a bad deal, but isnt that money also taxed when brought back??!!
What does the average lunch cost in Norway??
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NorwegianWood
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Joined: 24 Feb 2011
Posts: 53
Location: Norway

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welfare on top here too. Should have mentioned that in the first place. Basically: if you get sick while being here - it's free trestemt and you will get paid (Obamacare on steroids). In fact, you'll also get a few pension points. Not shure about how this is taxed when going back - but will look into that (thanks - good point).

Will of course also cover food while working. It's not a "golden" deal, but of you try to live basic - it should be possible to save up a little.

Eating lunch out here will set you back from $10 and upwards.

But if it turns out that ny rates are not competitive -I'll reconsider.
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
Posts: 8558
Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 3:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You got my attention, instead of providing a car, any chance of covering the shipping costs of my harley both ways?

Although I do not have experience with a gas-fired pit, my experience is instead all 100% wood-fired in a high-volume commercial setting, I work the line every day, and I am also the pitmaster. I see gas as being way easier to operate.

I think a few unique ring members have sampled my food and may vouch for me.....

My main concern is the quality of the beef, and how the grading system works to make sure you get the quality that you want.

Does having a partial Norwegian heritage help any?
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NorwegianWood
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Joined: 24 Feb 2011
Posts: 53
Location: Norway

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 4:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry - you don't need any references. I've read your posts here for around five years or so now - and every bone in my body say you're the real deal.

Bike-negotiations are absolutely on. That is if you're sure you'd like do ride a bike in Norway between late october and late april (no one else does)...

Your main concern (the beef-grading etc) is mine too ... I'm not too impressed with the norwegian vendors. But to my surprise - the KCBS guys I met here last year was very impressed. So maybe it's not so bad after all... I sure can tell you though - that it's different from your system. Not just a little different.

That said: I can make a decent brisket with the beef we can get our hands on - and the quality is stable.

Partial Norwegian heritage speaks to your advantage. It will be extra good news for the newspaper stories when we open - and it will hopefully make it possible for me to serve you both "rakfisk" and "lutefisk" without you saying NO before you've tasted it Wink

Just say the word and we'll get on the details Wink
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Mr Tony's BBQ
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Location: Fredonia Wi

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will vouch for Harry's abilities whether you need them or not!!
Did that KCBS guy happen to be Phil Wingo??? I know he travels the globe sharing his BBQ experience, and is my spice guy!
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NorwegianWood
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Location: Norway

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03 16 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nope - his name was Wayne Lohman.

I did a one day referee course. Figured it might be useful since I do one contest every year (Norwegian championship).

He was very enthusiastic about our local quality of meat. Personally - I think almost all our beef is to lean. Pork too. But I guess fat to meat ratio is not the only factor to consider when judging beef quality. There is also a problem that almost all beaf/pork you buy being too fresh. You do need to mature meat yourself - but that takes time and space (money). And then there is the issue on selection of cuts. At the moment there is only one vendor that does cut a traditional brisket. If I want a flank steak - I'll need to buy a cut that contains a lot more (luckily I can grind that stuff into burgers - but that's just one example). s--t - I'm on a rant here...
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Harry Nutczak
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Joined: 01 Mar 2007
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Location: The Northwoods

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04 16 3:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find Pork is best within 10 days of its processing date, anything after that it develops a funky smell.

Beef, I like 21 days aging for a minimum, and out to 45 days wet-age. Once it gets past 45 days, it can develop a gamey flavor. But that gamey flavor may just be preferred in your location...
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RodinBangkok
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Joined: 30 Dec 2006
Posts: 491
Location: Bangkok Thailand

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04 16 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Along with difference in meats from regions in the world, a big challenge can be your ability to substitute local ingredients for imported ones.
Even if available imported ingredients can add a huge amount to your food costs.

An example of ingredients that sticks out to me is apple cider vinegar. Here in Thailand any apple cider vinegar is imported and the cost is almost 10 times that of a common 5% white vinegar. So in this case we’ve reformulated all our sauces that require that apple background to use other ingredients such as juice and adjust the formulations to have the same flavor profile without the huge added ingredient costs.
That’s just one example.

I’d recommend the person chosen should be good at basic recipe design along with a deep understanding of cooking meats. IMHO this goes beyond a guy that has used the same smoker for 20 years and has developed a small set of recipes and techniques over that time using the same cuts from the same source in the states.

Choose carefully.

I did the same thing here years ago in the field of plastics design. In that case I had a large pool of retired engineers to choose from that were looking for something to do. We brought them to Thailand with their spouse at very low wages, in one case none, but gave them the chance to travel asia while they were consulting. It was a win win. Never had the need to do it for food though.
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NorwegianWood
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Joined: 24 Feb 2011
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Location: Norway

PostPosted: Tue Apr 05 16 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All good advise!

I've heard about the import tax in Thailand. Luckily it's not that bad here (except from some cheeses) - but still a valid point. Finding local substitutes/synonyms has been on my agenda for a while Smile

And I agree - basically understanding why something becomes a success and/or being able do adjust so that it does is what separates a proper chef and "someone working with food".
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